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New York City Primary Elections

Vote for New York City Mayor, Public Advocate, Comptroller, and More

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The 2009 New York City primary elections will be held on Tuesday, September 15, 2009. In 2009, New Yorkers will vote for mayor of New York City, New York City Public Advocate, New York City Comptroller, Borough Presidents for all five boroughs, and City Council representatives in many of New York City's 51 districts.

In the primary elections, candidates will battle for major party nominations to run in the general election on Tuesday, November 3, 2009. Primary elections will only be held if there is more than one candidate vying for a particular party's nomination for a particular race.

Read on for an overview of what you need to know before you vote in the 2009 New York City primary elections.

New York City Mayoral Primary Election

As the chief executive officer of the City of New York, the New York City Mayor is responsible for running city government operations and earns an annual salary of $225,000.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg will be running for a third term as the Republican candidate. Three Democratic candidates will face off in the primary election and the winner will face Mayor Bloomberg in November. The Democratic candidates include:
  • William Thompson -- The Democratic front-runner is current New York City Comptroller Bill Thompson.


  • Tony Avella -- City Councilman Tony Avella is also a former aide to Mayors Koch and Dinkins.


  • Roland Rogers -- Roland Rogers is a business executive and the former chairman of the Committee to Celebrate New York City's 350th Anniversary.

New York City Public Advocate Primary Election

The New York City Public Advocate is responsible for monitoring the public information and service complaint programs of city agencies and acts as Mayor in the Mayor’s absence. The New York City Public Advocate earns an annual salary of $165,000. In 2009, Alex T. Zablocki will run as the Republican candidate and face the winner of the Democratic primary election. The Democratic candidates in the 2009 New York City primary election are:
  • Bill de Blasio -- Front-runner Bill de Blasio is a City Councilman from Brooklyn.


  • Eric Gioia -- Eric Gioia is a City Councilman from Queens.


  • Mark Green -- Mark Green served as New York City's first Public Advocate from 1994-2001.


  • Norman Siegel -- Norman Siegel is a civil liberties attorney.


  • Imtiaz Shabbir Syed -- Imtiaz Shabbir Syed is an attorney and accountant.

New York City Comptroller Primary Election

The Comptroller is New York City's chief financial officer and earns an annual salary of $185,000.

Republican candidate Joseph A. Mendola will run against the winner of the Democratic primary election.

Democratic candidates for New York City Comptroller are:
  • Melinda Katz -- Melinda Katz is a City Councilwoman from Queens.


  • John C. Liu == John C. Liu is a City Councilman from Queens.


  • David I. Weprin -- David Weprin is a City Councilman from Queens.


  • David Yassky -- David Yassky is a City Councilman from Brooklyn.

Manhattan Borough President Primary Election

The Manhattan Borough Presidents is the chief executive of the borough and earns an annual salary of $160,000.

No primary election will be held for Manhattan Borough President. The Democratic incumbent Scott Stringer will face Republican candidate David Casavis in the general election on November 3, 2009.

There will also be no primary elections for the Borough President races in Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Staten Island. Read more about the Queens Borough President race.

New York City Council Primary Elections

The City Council represents the legislative branch of New York City's government and is responsible for passing local laws and overseeing city agencies. There are 51 Council members, one to represent each of 51 districts in the five boroughs of New York City. Each Council member earns an annual base salary of $112,500.

Call 866-VOTE-NYC for more information about voting in New York City.

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